A Term, A Term, My Old Car For A Term Part 3

Welcome back! This week, we continue our look at the article from the ASPERGAIN (again, there call-caps, not mine) and how the whole spectrum definition might be skewed. Last we left off, I talked a bit about the names of some of the colours of the Autism/Asperger rainbow (Pragmatic, Social Awareness and the rest), along with a possible replacement name for it: instead of spectrum, perhaps we could call them a trait, or an ability, or a skill (The more positive sounding, the better in cases like these). But, enough stalling for now, let's get back to the main event!

 

Stalled Puddle Walk Reflection

Don’t you hate it when people stall? It’s like “common man! I wanna get to the next part already!” I had a buddy of mine right? He stalled for so long right? He stalled for so long, we missed most of the when we finally got in the theater. Another buddy of mine right? We was trying to get to an event right? And he...

 

So, to harken back to last weeks post abit, if you check all or most of the boxes listed on the article, you are on the...Autistic/Aspie trait list (almost said spectrum). According to the article. But if you check off only one or two of the boxes, than the article says that it’s not Autism/Aspergers  you have, but something else entirely. E.g.: you struggle with communication alone? You have communication disorder. Problems with only movement/control? Dyspraxia/developmental coordination disorder, or you could shorten it to DCD (an amalgam that sounds like CDC, but switch the letters around). Sensory processing issues? Sensory processing disorder. And you get the rest.

 

Hence the problem with the phrase “we’re all a little autistic” (other than the obvious ones. Oh you are, are you? So tell me, what are YOUR obsessions? Bare in mind that obsessions are not something that we simply enjoy, but something that we enjoy intensely and will attempt to learn EVERYTHING about it. Literally, everything). If you just hate fluorescent lights, or feel awkward in some/all social situations, you are not a little Autistic/Aspie, you just hate fluorescent lights or feel awkward in some/all social situations (that said, you should still probably see your GP, incase you need some form of assistance).

 

Computer Business Typing Keyboard Laptop Doctor

Or another name for GP (General Practitioner, hope I spelled that right), is family doctor. But what if you don’t have a family? What if you are a family of one? Are they then known as a PD, personal doctor? This is an important question folks.

 

The article put it in another, I think interesting, way: it’s the equivalent of saying “you are dressed ‘a little rainbowy’ when you are wearing only red’” (Aspergian, It’s a spectrum doesn't mean what you think). And, for those of you who may not know this, and at the risk of already repeating what was already said in the last post about the article (the article on it’s own repeats itself in some areas), not every person who is Autistic/Aspie has the exact same traits, and the exact same strengths. While one person may be able to handle themselves very well in social situations, hitting all the right notes and picking up most, if not all, of the social cues. Another person may need a lot of help in the same social situation, a kind of guide or coach. While one may have very few repetitive behaviours, and know what kind are socially acceptable, others may have quite a bit of repetitive behaviours, and/or may not know or understand which ones are okay to do in public. You get the idea.

 

Well, that does it for this week's post. Next week I will either do one last segment on the article, or move onto another topic to keep things entertaining (and to keep things suspenseful as always, I won’t tell you which one I’ll do! Oh, it’s not that suspenseful? Because in the end you’ll find out anyways and it won’t really affect your world that much? Can you pretend to be in suspense? It’d really help my ratings. Might even get you day or so off work if the boss thinks you are suffering some kind of extreme stress! Or get you simply kicked out from a public space, but that's the risk you take.). But until next time, this continues to be, The Audacious Aspie.     

 

Sources used:

https://theaspergian.com/2019/05/04/its-a-spectrum-doesnt-mean-what-you-think/




A Term, A Term, My Old Car For A Term

Welcome back! This week we continue to look at the article from THE ASPERGIAN A NEURODIVERGENT COLLECTIVE (their all-caps, not mine. Probably trying to be all dramatic and such) AND THE TOPIC OF...sorry, forgot I left caps-lock on, and the topic of the article: spectrum; does it really mean what we think it means? Last week I was going on about how the author is using the colour spectrum as an example of the Autism/Aspergers spectrum, but it’s also not like the Autism/Aspergers spectrum (and how I was not able to cover that last week but hope to do so this week). So just how exactly is the colour spectrum not like the neurological spectrum? Well let's take a look-see.

 

Colour Wheel Chromatic Rainbow Palette Spectrum

You know how a black hole is a hole that sucks in everything, including light (hence the name black hole), this looks like a pic of what a white hole would look like: a hole that spews out everything, including light. Lots and lots of light.

 

Firstly, according to the author, we talk about the spectrum as if it’s a gradient, rather than an actual spectrum. You can either be a “little autistic/aspie”,  “a-lot autistic/aspie”, or somewhere in between (alternatively, the author notes, “a-lot autistic/aspie” is also known as “tragic autistic/aspie”. Something we may have all heard of before). But, like all other stereotypical ways used to define minority groups, this is a rather simplistic way of categorizing a diverse group. It's not like your traits get worse as you move up on the spectrum (or for the nerdy/geeky, it’s not like you levelling up your character but instead of getting more powerful skills/powers, they just get worse).

 

Apparently, according to the article, the whole spectrum thing is so far off that even the DSM-V is against it. Calling Autism/Aspergerss an “uneven profile of abilities” (THE ASPERGIAN: A NEURODIVERGENT COLLECTIVE). Must be why there is a saying of “if you’ve seen one person with autism, you’ve met on one person with autism” (or so the article says, this is the first time I’ve heard of it). Autism/Aspergers’s, the article claims, is not one condition but a myriad of related neurological conditions, impossibly intertwined that professionals have stopped trying to sort them in neat boxes (weather the article means actual professionals or “professionals” is unclear, but probably the former).

 

Businessman Boxes Transport Delivery Logistics Box

Ever wonder how many boxes they came up with to try and fit us in? My guess is thirty, but chances are I’m not even close.

 

Instead, the article says, the spectrum is really more like a rainbow of traits, rather than a spectrum of traits. The colours being: Pragmatic language, Social awareness, Monotropic mindset, Information processing, Sensory processing, Repetitive behaviours and Neuro-motor differences (I won’t post the meaning of all the phrases above here, as that would take more time than I want to. If you want to see the meanings, then I suggest you visit the article here. Yes, I am that lazy). How do you know you’re Autistic/Asperger? If you check all, or most of the boxes on the list, than you, dear reader, are on the spectrum. At least as far as the article is concerned, still might want to get tested by a professional rather than a random site online, unless you like webMD.

 

Doctor Dentist Dental Clinic Medical Surgeon

Ever heard of webMD? I ran a test where I put in some symptoms (runny nose, sneezing, eye blinking), that happens when I get allergies, and I got a list like this: ADHD, Epilepsy, intoxication and more, in that order. I guess allergies didn't even make the top ten.

 

Well that does it for this week’s post. Next week we will continue to peer through this article, and maybe find out what what we are supposed to call the Autism/Aspergers’s, if not a spectrum (just looked at the article now, and it is a loooooong one, probably won’t cover all of it). But until then, this continues to be, The Audacious Aspie.    

 

P.S. After getting some feedback and doing some research, I now regret writing my posts about CASDA and it’s proposal. I was unaware that they worked with Autism Speaks, and therefore wrote a couple of posts promoting their plan in my error. Next time I will do better.


Source used:

https://theaspergian.com/2019/05/04/its-a-spectrum-doesnt-mean-what-you-think/




A National Proposed Solution to an International Problem

Hello! This week, we will be looking at what is a revolutionary new idea (at least for Canada) to help improve people with ASD/Aspergers syndrome: a national Autism  program. What, exactly, is such a program? Well let's just ask our next guest. They’re a company who, in a list of media companies in alphabetical order would quickly follow ABC and the BBC. They’re a company that is not only funded by a national government, but are allowed to mock them in broad daylight without any repercussions (thus far). They’re Canada’s own, the CBC! (cue hollywood cheers and screams of excite-wait! Don’t leave! I promise it won’t be this noisy or crowded for long!).

 

Pedestrians People Busy Movement Hectic Osaka

It’s really only loud and crowded for the intro! The rest of the event will be really quite and sparse! I just want it to look good for the cameras, make it look like I have thousands of adoring fans.

 

And who should be the first brave soul/scape goat-if-it-all-falls-apart to lead the charge on such a daring idea? The federal government (i.e Ottawa)! And who is the poster man (he’s kind of old to be called a boy these days) to be the face of this bold plan? Why, who else other than sheriff Sen. Jim Munson of course! (doesn't the name Jim Munson sound particularly Canadian wild wild west to you? Not only polite, but also a man with some authority as will). But he’s not alone, the activist organization CASDA, or Canadian Autism Spectrum Disorders Alliance (and an extra A in there and you get CASADA, which would sound a lot like their country of origin) is teaming up with him in this endeavor for improved Autism care.

 

Now, they have released a blueprint (even though it may not actually be blue. How many blueprints these days are really blue you think?), detailing that all provinces, territories and, of course, the federal government to work together to create and maintain services for both children and adults on the spectrum (Don’t die of shock now anyone, but a major Autistic/Asperger organization, at least in Canada, actually remembered about the existence of adults being on the spectrum! ((little girl shriek of glee)). Either way, like I said before, this a bold plan indeed, if only because getting the federal and provincial/territorial governments to work together on something without political in-fighting soon breaking the alliance is, will...problematic at best. This can either go really well, or really poorly.

 

Dice Luck Hand Chance Gamble Risk Gambling Roll

Sort of like trying to when the lottery innit? Except when you lose at the lottery, you really only $2.00 or so on the ticket, plus all your hopes and dreams of becoming rich (until the next time when you repeat the process). When you lose in the government, you stand to lose a lot more.

 

That being said, it’s promising news that a Senator and an activist organization are joining forces for just such a cause. Perhaps the political world might be able to pull it off after all.  How long exactly has CASDA, and the senator, been calling for support for people on the spectrum? Why, over a decade of course (the senator once participating in a senate inquiry years back calling for a national autism inquiry. He was advocating for a national Autism support program before it was cool...politically). Inside the blueprint, the the chair women of CASDA says, one will find an “overarching vision and promise to the community we represent” (CBC news, Group calls for national autism program, Paragraph 6) like a lifetime guarantee to full and equal access to resources both whenever and wherever you need’em. Now that, is a plan that I can get behind.

 

Moon Blood Moon Full Moon Moonlight Mystical Night

So, especially if you live in Canada, you may want to get out your sacrificial daggers, find that virgin and light that fire, ‘cause we might need all the dark magic that we can get.

That does it for this week. Next week we will be continuing our look at this Canadian National autism program, and pray/hope/make a blood sacrifice in the hopes that if it comes to fruition, and is found to work like a dream come true, the next government coming in won’t scrape the whole deal all because it was the last party that implemented it. Here in Canada, it probably happens more than we would like to admit. But until then, this continues to be, the Audacious Aspie.

 

Sources:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/casda-national-autism-program-1.5080391




The Autistic/Asperger Atoll Gets a Little Bigger

Welcome back! This week, we will once again dive into unknown waters (mind the kraken), and explore the little-known island, called Cri du chat. A place that, not many, least certainly not me, has heard of before, but is akin in many ways to our own little cluster of islands that I like to call, the  Autistic/Asperger Atoll (an island for each of us, lord knows we could use alone time sometimes). In fact, much like the island of Down syndrome the Cri du chat island is so close to our own island chain, that one might consider even consider it a part of the Atoll. But what is Cri du chat, despite a metaphorical island that I made up? Will, it is much more than just a fake island. Much more.

 

Nuclear Weapons Test Nuclear Weapon Weapons Test

Doesn't all this talk about islands and atolls just want you to take a vaca to a real Island resort? Basking in the hot sun, being served hand and foot, holding on to dear life while trying to not be blown away by the blast from a nuclear bomb test...will, at least the first two.

 

Cri du chat syndrome is, according to SLATE, a rare genetic disorder that gives the person who has it with “multiple intensive disabilities” (SLATE, NOT MINE TO MOLD, paragraph 1). One of them being nonverbal Autism/Aspergers. This particular article of SLATE tells a rather sobering tale of a mother learning of the unique challenges posed, not by her son, but by the institutions who are supposed to care for people like her sons, and their families. Not gonna lie folks, it won’t be easy to make jokes with this one as opposed to the last one (which was all about our humorous side! Will, all about the myth that we don’t have a humours side but you get the idea).

 

So just what was it that the institutions suggested? Only the usual suggestions: leave him in a feeding clinic were a group of caregivers will put him in a room with a bunch of strangers and repeatedly encourage him to eat something over an extended period of time. Or, and I’m sure that this is one that we, or our parents at any rate, have been told at least once in our/their lives, that she have her son institutionalized (the world seems to think that we belong only in an institution. And they’re right. I’m in an institution after all. Okay okay, it’s a postsecondary education institution but it still counts as an institution).

 

George Peabody B├╝cherei Peabody Institute Baltimore

Man, I wish my universities library was this fancy. I would never tire of walking around its seemingly endless levels than. Or until closing hour came and they chase me around the library until finally cornering me and catching me, after suffering some scratches and bite marks. (sigh), a man can dream.

 

But, her being the mother of the child, only had to imagine herself in her childs shoes in those situations, and know that it would be, will, a pretty poor choice to put it mildly. But there was one bit of advice that was suggested to them (by whom the author does not say): “seek out other parents of children with similar medical issues.” (SLATE, Not Mine to Mold, paragraph 4). A kind of community were a sense of belonging, tips on practically everything (examples given are going through the educational system and picking out wheelchairs), and commiserating over a shared struggle. Group healing, in other words.

 

Will, that does it for this week's post. Next week, we will continue our look into the article about Cri du chat, though probably not for too much longer, as there is so much sadness and depression in the world already, that if we really wanted to read about kids being mistreated by an uncaring system (an odd obsession I know but bear with me), we really only have to read the newspaper or listen to the radio. Hold on, I’ve just received news that it has always been like that. Will than, as an unlicensed and uneducated-in-the-ways-of-psychology psychologist, In recommend you read or listen to a happy story each and every day, or even go one better and get some physical exercise as often as you can.

 

On further reflection, you probably don't need me telling you that. But until then, this continues to be, the Audacious Aspie.    

Sources used:

https://slate.com/human-interest/2018/12/parents-of-kids-with-disabilities.html