Chaotic Confusion Part 3

Welcome back! This week, we continue, once again, our look at why we get stressed when confused, continuing on from last week were we looked at how the article ties stress from confusion, and melt downs, together. Basically saying that the stress from confusion comes from living in a world that not only doesn’t understand us, but also expects us to act like we are the same as the wider population, than punishes us whenever we eventually break form the act in nervous break downs (it may seem like an anxity teen thing, the whole world not understanding us and the rest, but to talk to anyone who is Autistic/Aspie, and you will realize that the problem transcends age and affects literally all of us).

 

Sad Girl Sadness Broken Heart Suffer Moody Autumn

When we do act out, it’s not so much with big sighs, or eye rolls, or “OMGS!!!!!!”, but more like people who are actually dealing with an issue that we face everyday.

 

But wait! it gets even more complicated than that! As bad as living in a world that does not understand us and the rest is, the second part of the problem, expected to act like everyone else, proves to be a unique stressor all its own. Think about it: has any one of us in the Autism/Asperger community naturally knew how to act like an NT? I sure didn’t, and in most cases still don’t, or at least only in passing. We have to learn the various social cues, verbal cues and the rest when interacting with the rest of society. All the while being misunderstood by them and being expected not to show cracks in our facade.

 

That, the article claims, is like “learning through fear and intimidation which is not learning at all” (THE ASPERGIAN, Paragraph 15, Why Being Confused Is Absolutely Panic-Inducing For Most Autistics). And from there we move on to the articles second point: how society goes about teaching. Our school systems, or at least the ones in Canada as they are the only ones I am familiar with, do tend to teach in one way and one way only: by reading, memorizing and regurgitating information onto tests and exams. Metaphorically regurgitating. Actually regurgitating the answers would bu just unsanitary. All other forms of learning are poo-poo’ed, and any student who tries them, so the article says, is punished (not always severely, but passive aggressively, only the second-worst kind of aggressiveness).

 

Kids Girl Pencil Drawing Notebook Study Friends

Oh sure, those kids may look like they are having fun, they are really bending under the unyielding one-way doctrine of schools everywhere! See how unreasonably close they are to the paper?

 

But that’s not how human beings work (not the first time an institution, run by fellow human beings mind you, seemingly forget how the human soul/brain/consciousness works). We all, both NT and diverse, learn in different ways, from hands-on, to visuals, and than some. Some would say that it’s hard to see what’s happening on the street from all the way up in the ivory tower, but I would like to assume that they are rather working in a kind of two or three story ivory office building instead, fixed to their computers for hours on end with minimal human contact. After hours of sitting there with only the screen, some music and the ever-increasing boredom growing on you to keep you company, you’d feel more machine than man yourself. I know that feeling, as I work in a office job myself.

 

Well, that does it for this week! Next week we will move on to a different topic altogether using my high processing power to search the web for related topics. Shoot, I mean type in commands on my computer, to search the web for related topics (nailed it that time). But until than, this continues to be, the Artificial Intelligence. I mean The Audacious Aspie.

 

Source Used:

 https://theaspergian.com/2019/05/22/panic-and-confusion/


Chaotic Confusion Part 2

Welcome back! This week we will continue our look at why Autistics/Aspies often feel chaotic when confused (chaotic as in there normal routine is disrupted, not chaotic as in they suddenly become anarchist’s or agents of chaos like the Joker). Last week I talked about why I thought we felt some/a lot of stress when confused (depends on the severity of the confusion), while I stated before hand that I would be reviewing the site THE ASPERGIAN and their article on the subject. How’s that for confusion? But anyways, lets get back to subject from the source in the hot seat shall we?

 

Balancing Chair Fashion Man Model Person

I Tried To Find A Picture Of A Seat Either Literally On Fire, Or In An Interrogation-Like Scene, But Than I Found This And Thought: Why Not? Let The Subject Try To Stand On A Chair Like This For Hours On End. Just As Uncomfortable As Actually Sitting On A Fire-Chair.

So why, according to THE ASPERGIAN, do we feel insecurity when confused? First, it wants to talk about meltdowns. There is a belief, so it says, among most of those who are not Autistic/Aspie that meltdowns are part and parcel of, well, being Autistic/Aspie. The author of the article for ASPERGIAN disagrees, and frankly so do I. Rather, as the ASPERGIAN author notes, it’s not that simple. For those of you who are Autistic/Aspie, you most likely already know what a meltdown is, and that it has nothing to do with a nuclear power plant. But for the un-initiated, it’s basically what happens when our senses are overwhelmed (lots of flashing lights coupled with loud music/noises and lots of movement, for example), followed on the heels by an overwhelming emotional response (varies from person to person, from what I do, which is to completely shut down or to refuse to speak or acknowledge the environment around us, to acting out).

But, the article notes, that while it is not inevitable in and of itself, it is basically inevitable for us Autistics/Aspies living in an NT world. The whole Apple in a Mac world kind of scenario (or is it Mac in an Apple world? I can never remember). If you’re not aware of this phrase, or don’t know what it means, it’s basically an Apple (or Mac) living in the Macs world, having to play by their rules: act the way they act, speak the way they speak, and so on with out seeming like a fish out of water. Talk to any Autistic/Aspie, or if your one yourself, than you know the kind of skills it takes to pull that off.

 

Action Adult Paralympics Prosthetic Athlete

It’s Like Practicing To Run In The Olympics, Except You Do It Everyday For No Real Gain Or Recognition For It Either.

Now, the article says, this does not happen once, or twice, but repeatedly through out our lives day by day. With all that strain coming down on Autistic’s/Aspie’s, or indeed anyone, it’s no surprise that they eventually break down. In our case, it takes the form of a melt down. But the problem isn’t in the fact that we have melt downs, its rather how the outside world, the NT world, reacts. Rather than attempting to calm us down, or find out what, or who, is it that has set us off, they rebuke us instead for acting out. For not being able to keep up the charade of being an NT when we are not. The perp in the mean time is let off the hook.

Well, this does it for this weeks post! Next week we will continue our look at the article, possibly finding out why we Autistics/Aspies feel anxious when confused. But until than you’ll just have to make do with feeling confused for now (don’t worry, it’ll pass. It’s not like the world keeps coming up with conundrums like: Why did a world leader say that? Did a celebrity really just do that? Is that really a smart thing to go to war over?) but until than, this continues to be, the Audacious Aspie.

Source:

https://theaspergian.com/2019/05/22/panic-and-confusion/


Some Personal Thoughts

Welcome back! This week I will be talking about my thoughts on the whole Autism/Aspergers spectrum/not a spectrum topic. I know I know, my last message said that I would not be looking into the topic again for a while, but what I meant was that I would not be looking more into the article, or other information on this issue, for a while. Not stop talking about it. See the kind of verbal gymnastics I did there to try and weasel out of trouble? Impressive right? But enough weaseling, or mental gymnasticking (thats a word right?) let's get back to talking about my opinion.

 

Animals Weasel SummerHere is the majestic weasel, an animal known for being used to describe someone who is trying wriggle out of blame for something they may/may not have done.

 

On the question of the term, some of you say that the term neurodiversity is better sounding, more encompassing and accurate term than spectrum is, and perhaps you are right. Although admittedly, I did not think of the term “spectrum” in the same sense as the colour spectrum, in my view the article makes some good points (from what I have read of it). It does sort of make you think of a sliding Autism/Asperger scale doesn't it? That you are either this much Autistic/Aspie or this much. Either you are a little Autistic/Aspie or a lot, but in my opinion you are either Autistic/Aspie, or you’re not. There is not such thing as “a little Autistic/Aspie” (think of it like this: someone is either a moron or they are not, no one is “a little moronic”. Though in comparison of that person’s moronic actions to another, you’d probably think otherwise).

 

We, the Autistic/Asperger community, however, must be the ones to decide on a new term if we are to replace the old one. It will have to be one that hits all the marks we deem important, like inclusivity (including all the people whom we want to part of our community, whether it is just those with Autism/Asperger’s or people who are wired differently in general), encourage others acceptance of us and the diversity that resides within our community. I was just spitballing there, but you get the idea. We will need to put a lot of thought into what our new term would be, if we do decide to change it (doesn't that phrase sound disgusting to you? Although it could be worse, it could be “I’m just spitting hot nuegies here).

 

Blowfly Blue Bottle Fly Insect Pest Bug Ugly

The phrase “spitballing” or “hot nuegie” is almost as gross as seeing this fly up close, and not wanting to eat it. Except it’s not up close, it’s the size of a small dog, and it is in fact your dinner.

 

You have probably realized from some of my former posts  that I am advocating for some rather serious changes to some of the names already assigned to us, and doubtless I’m not the only one doing it to. But I think that now is the time we start to seriously consider whether we want to keep the same labels already assigned to us, considering that we, the Autistic/Asperger community, probably were not even asked on how we felt about the terms assigned to us (do you understand what I’m trying to say? I hope so, because while I know what I am trying to say, I’m not always sure how to word it right. Sigh, the curse of being a literally misunderstood artist, it is a cross I must bare).

 

That’s it for this week. Next week we will for sure for sure move on to a new topic (and no, it won’t be my thoughts on my thoughts. That’s for another date). But until next time, this continues to be, The Audacious Aspie.     

 

Sources used:

https://theaspergian.com/2019/05/04/its-a-spectrum-doesnt-mean-what-you-think/


A Term, A Term, My Old Car For A Term Part 3

Welcome back! This week, we continue our look at the article from the ASPERGAIN (again, there call-caps, not mine) and how the whole spectrum definition might be skewed. Last we left off, I talked a bit about the names of some of the colours of the Autism/Asperger rainbow (Pragmatic, Social Awareness and the rest), along with a possible replacement name for it: instead of spectrum, perhaps we could call them a trait, or an ability, or a skill (The more positive sounding, the better in cases like these). But, enough stalling for now, let's get back to the main event!

 

Stalled Puddle Walk Reflection

Don’t you hate it when people stall? It’s like “common man! I wanna get to the next part already!” I had a buddy of mine right? He stalled for so long right? He stalled for so long, we missed most of the when we finally got in the theater. Another buddy of mine right? We was trying to get to an event right? And he...

 

So, to harken back to last weeks post abit, if you check all or most of the boxes listed on the article, you are on the...Autistic/Aspie trait list (almost said spectrum). According to the article. But if you check off only one or two of the boxes, than the article says that it’s not Autism/Aspergers  you have, but something else entirely. E.g.: you struggle with communication alone? You have communication disorder. Problems with only movement/control? Dyspraxia/developmental coordination disorder, or you could shorten it to DCD (an amalgam that sounds like CDC, but switch the letters around). Sensory processing issues? Sensory processing disorder. And you get the rest.

 

Hence the problem with the phrase “we’re all a little autistic” (other than the obvious ones. Oh you are, are you? So tell me, what are YOUR obsessions? Bare in mind that obsessions are not something that we simply enjoy, but something that we enjoy intensely and will attempt to learn EVERYTHING about it. Literally, everything). If you just hate fluorescent lights, or feel awkward in some/all social situations, you are not a little Autistic/Aspie, you just hate fluorescent lights or feel awkward in some/all social situations (that said, you should still probably see your GP, incase you need some form of assistance).

 

Computer Business Typing Keyboard Laptop Doctor

Or another name for GP (General Practitioner, hope I spelled that right), is family doctor. But what if you don’t have a family? What if you are a family of one? Are they then known as a PD, personal doctor? This is an important question folks.

 

The article put it in another, I think interesting, way: it’s the equivalent of saying “you are dressed ‘a little rainbowy’ when you are wearing only red’” (Aspergian, It’s a spectrum doesn't mean what you think). And, for those of you who may not know this, and at the risk of already repeating what was already said in the last post about the article (the article on it’s own repeats itself in some areas), not every person who is Autistic/Aspie has the exact same traits, and the exact same strengths. While one person may be able to handle themselves very well in social situations, hitting all the right notes and picking up most, if not all, of the social cues. Another person may need a lot of help in the same social situation, a kind of guide or coach. While one may have very few repetitive behaviours, and know what kind are socially acceptable, others may have quite a bit of repetitive behaviours, and/or may not know or understand which ones are okay to do in public. You get the idea.

 

Well, that does it for this week's post. Next week I will either do one last segment on the article, or move onto another topic to keep things entertaining (and to keep things suspenseful as always, I won’t tell you which one I’ll do! Oh, it’s not that suspenseful? Because in the end you’ll find out anyways and it won’t really affect your world that much? Can you pretend to be in suspense? It’d really help my ratings. Might even get you day or so off work if the boss thinks you are suffering some kind of extreme stress! Or get you simply kicked out from a public space, but that's the risk you take.). But until next time, this continues to be, The Audacious Aspie.     

 

Sources used:

https://theaspergian.com/2019/05/04/its-a-spectrum-doesnt-mean-what-you-think/